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“Ghosts?”

Circular Congregational Church
Ranked #32 of 191 things to do in Charleston
Certificate of Excellence
Attraction details
Reviewed 9 September 2018

The Circular Church as our last stop on a ghost tour. It was very dark making the grave yard very creepy. We were encouraged to take photos and I must admit, I did pick up some odd distortions on my pictures.

Date of experience: September 2018
Thank Borioles97
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
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"meeting house"
in 3 reviews
"burial ground"
in 3 reviews
"unique architecture"
in 3 reviews
"original settlers"
in 2 reviews
"grave sites"
in 2 reviews
"gateway walk"
in 2 reviews
"interesting building"
in 2 reviews
"meeting street"
in 4 reviews
"national historic landmark"
in 2 reviews
"amazing grace"
in 2 reviews
"walked around"
in 2 reviews
"holy city"
in 3 reviews
"open to the public"
in 2 reviews
"worth a visit"
in 3 reviews
"downtown charleston"
in 3 reviews
"civil war"
in 4 reviews
"south carolina"
in 2 reviews
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11 - 15 of 117 reviews

Reviewed 28 August 2018

In 1681 members were referred to as "dissenters" as they would not adhere the the Anglican Church in England or here in the colonies. The members included English Congregationalists, French Huguenots and Scottish Presbyterians. African-Americans both free and enslaved were included in the flock. The church yard is the oldest in the city. The building dates from 1892 and is listed in the National Register. Today the church is a United Church of Christ(Progressive) and they advertise in their web-site that they do not take the Bible literally. The Church was closed when we visited but the yard and old historic graves could be visited which we did.

Date of experience: April 2018
Thank Richard S
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed 7 July 2018

We only went to the graveyard. It is very interesting with graves dating back to the 1600. Many old ones are hard to read but it looked like some have been restored. The history is amazing to read on the gravestones.

Date of experience: June 2018
1  Thank Melinda N
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed 5 July 2018

we went past on two tours and received the history. You can walk through the grave yard which also has an interesting history. We did not go inside, not sure if you can but go see it on a walking tour and get the history.

Date of experience: June 2018
1  Thank Lois L
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
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Reviewed 31 May 2018

This morning I am walking to visit The Circular Congregational Church graveyard because it has a lot of history – Charles Towne's original settlers founded this protestant, or dissenting, church about 1681. The graveyard of Circular church is likely the oldest English burial ground still in existence in Charleston. While many gravestones have disappeared, more than 500 remain, with about 730 individuals named on those stones. Another 620 people are named in church records with indications they were most likely buried in the graveyard. The earliest unmarked grave: 1695.

The skull and crossbones of the earliest slates evolve into the skull with wings, the angel's head with wings, and then portrait busts, first primitive and then classical. Markers in the 1600s typically were inscribed with stark skull-and-crossbones markings, the ancient symbol of death. Although skulls were still in plain evidence, the crossbones were beginning to be replaced by wings and the resulting image was being called "death's head." So, although the skull continued to emphasize death, the wings were introducing the idea of flight from the Earth or life after death. As the years passed, the sculptors emphasized life more and death less and less. At first they began softening the skulls' appearances by adding upper lips and eyebrows, and later they even began adding noses and mouths.

Date of experience: May 2018
1  Thank edcmoverman
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

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