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Dead Sea Swim

Atlantic City, New...
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Dead Sea Swim
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Hello. Is it possible to swim in the Dead Sea in early November or will it be too cold?

11 replies to this topic
Petra - Wadi Musa...
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1. Re: Dead Sea Swim
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Yes!

In November the temperature is fairly warm in Dead sea region, around 24C°~27C°.

Amman, Jordan
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for Syria, Aleppo, Jordan
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Dead sea enjoyed all year around.Temprature .Water is warm enough for a dip flat and take photos.you dnt spend much time in the sea. Dead sea region usually ten degrees hotter than than in amman or rest of the country.its known as winter resort.

raymond

amman pasha hotel

Sandown, New...
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Do not swim in the Dead Sea!!! All you can really do is float around like a cork. Splashing around and getting water in your eyes is something you will not forget. Also, do not use a razor the day before. Any small nicks and cuts, even very tiny ones, will be very painful in the water.

Wear an old swimsuit... something that if you ruined would be ok. And, wear some good water shoes. Avoid flip-flops as they will not stay on your feet.

Enjoy

Dr. Z

Petra - Wadi Musa...
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Dr. Z

Swimming in the Dead sea is one of the most interesting things you can do, as the salty water will lift you up once you relax yourself with no efforts needed to swim, recommending someone to not do it in this way might cause them fear and thus ruining a potential lifetime experience.

Caution should be taken as the dead sea water is very salty but no big deal must be made of it, once you recognize the water around you it's easy thing to enjoy.

Sandown, New...
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Our interpretation of the word "swim" differs.

Anything that creates splashing should be avoided. Floating, like a cork, is the best way to experience the Dead Sea...

Petra - Wadi Musa...
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Dr. Z

Please stay in your reagion of expertise, it's well known how swimming in dead sea would be, it's not an Olympic pool.

Safety information are available online and on each site, no need to enter such unnecessary caution expressions.

Sandown, New...
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As I suspected; our definition of the word “swimming”differs.

Kimberly, feel free to message me if you have any questions.

Edited: March 26, 2021, 7:09 am
Amman, Jordan
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for Syria, Aleppo, Jordan
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a correction to my post above.

at dead sea you do the ritual dip in water, float and take photos. well can be reading a magazine too

well can also cover your body with black salty sticky mud ashore and take more photos

that is the highlights for visitors.

enjoy

raymond

amman pasha hotel

Petra - Wadi Musa...
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9. Re: Dead Sea Swim
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November is usually still fine at the Dead Sea but check the weather forecast before you go, some days can be cold and wet. As said in previous post, you don't swim in the Dead Sea, you float. Avoid splashing and be careful when you flip onto your belly as you will notice your balance will shift and your head will go down first with the result you get water in your eyes ... not funny at all ;-)

Patricia (Petra Bed & Breakfast - Horse Riding Jordan)

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Kimberly, the Dead Sea is unlike any other sea or ocean - it is unique in itself. I am going to add to the list of useful tips already provided by post #3. Most travelers have different expectations when they arrive. You should take a bottle of water with you when you go to the beach itself. The Dead Sea shoreline recedes over 3 feet each year so the fresh water facilities (showers, etc.) are farther from the beach than they were when the hotels and public beach were built years ago. I bring up the water issue because if you get any water in your eyes, you will want to rinse it out ASAP. The first time I went to the Dead Sea, I was pulling my hair back behind my ears and I got some water in my eyes and mouth - it was excruciating. Somebody at the shoreline had to help me to my towel because the stinging was made worse by the blazing sun reflecting off the water. Also, the salt water tastes awful and will linger for some time. Remember that the Dead Sea has a salinity rate of 34% and has 9 times more salt than any ocean. Keep your hands away from your face and don't splash around and you will be fine.

Try to minimize shaving, cuts, hang nails, etc. days before you take a dip - again, because it will sting. You can also use a liquid bandaid if you have a cut.

You can't really swim because of the buoyancy and the water feels a little thicker. (it also feels a little slimy/greasy but that's another issue.) Best you can do is float and wade. As for floating, it can get a little tricky. You will need to balance yourself on your back because if you lean even an inch or 2 to one side, the water will flip you to your side. It's kind of a cool experience but again, the goal is to keep your face out of the water. This kind of goes without saying but I'll raise if for other readers - don't dunk your head in the water. One child did so in late 2019 when he thought he could actually see the sea floor with his water goggles and his parents and lifeguard ended up with a wailing child for 30 minutes.

There is no "sand" like most beaches - you won't be digging your toes in any sand like at Aqaba or Eilat. The beach consists of packed dirt that has been hardened by the salt. Additionally, it is very uncomfortable to walk barefoot (at times painful) because of the salt crystals formed on the ground - in some parts feels like broken glass.

As for a bathing suit, definitely wear one you don't care about. It's custom to mud up and "bake" in the sun for 20 minutes, per the lifeguard's instructions. However, you can't just get in the water and think the mud will slide off or get under a shower. Per the lifeguard, you need to scrape it off with the loose gravely dirt on the shore line. After your baking session, the mud is pretty well wedded on your skin and needs a light abrasive to take it off. Often people sit on the shoreline scrubbing it off. Naturally, your bathing suit may not look as shiny and new as it was before your dip and mud up.

Going to the Dead Sea is a great and unique experience. The reason you have travelers on TripAdvisor sharing their experiences is so that you are aware of some of the drawbacks so that you have a more enjoyable experience.

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