Things to Do in Sugar Land

Top Things to Do in Sugar Land

Things to Do in Sugar Land

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What travelers are saying

  • Chef P
    Eatontown, NJ8 contributions
    Great field to watch a game. Clean, and the seats have great views. Not too big. Concessions are affordable, they even have a huge shop inside the seating area with shirts and hats.
    Written 14 October 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Sunni M
    Houston, TX20 contributions
    We have been here 3 times, I think, because of our membership. It's a nice place, but is not very grand after seeing the greatness of the HMNS Houston location. My kids are 2, 4, and 6, and we usually spend about 45 minutes here.
    Written 9 June 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Sunni M
    Houston, TX20 contributions
    We love this children's museum. It's part of the Houston children's museum, and is therefore covered under that membership. We might never go back to the Houston location. Almost all of the same attractions as downtown location, just a slightly smaller scale. Convenient parking and a covered path to the door (awesome on rainy or hot days). My kids love it (ages 2, 4, and 6), and I usually drag them away after about 2 hours.
    Written 9 June 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Debbie R
    1 contribution
    Hotel shuttle took us to the Concert to see Frankie Valli and Four Seasons. Read on website that you could not bring a purse larger than 4x6 , and everything was cashless Credit Card only. So I took just a credit card, my tickets, and FULLY charged cell phone and husband took wallet. Man came out screaming about the size of women's purses and the what exceptions were. (may I suggest a megaphone)
    Food and drinks were way over priced but hey you are there for the concert not to EAT!! The security line was no worse than the line at the security at the airport.
    The concert was FANTASTIC and we had a GREAT TIME !! Until the end please tell your Volunteers to be a little more friendly to the patrons who need help, my husband and I were left stranded because the Hotel shuttle could not return to pick us up and I ask one of your volunteers how you ordered a Lyft ride and she was very rude to me!! Please ask your volunteers to be a little more compassionate to people. Otherwise the overall experience was a great one
    Written 24 October 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • tatch0926
    Manila, Philippines21 contributions
    It’s a very quiet park and a perfect place for runners and walkers as well. And on weekends it’s an ideal place for families to have picnics.
    Written 7 August 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • mojomo
    Texas6,377 contributions
    Escape into nature. Right in the city, you can slip away into this beautiful park.

    Great trails, although they always get a little confusing.

    Beautiful old trees.

    We followed the Oyster Creek trail and part of the Piney trail.

    We actually saw three deer!

    Some better signage would be helpful as we got a little turned around on our way back out.

    I’d appreciate more benches as well.

    Also there was a young guy up in a tree who gave us a start. He seemed harmless enough.

    Unfortunately, shortly after my husband spotted a woman with a gun in plain sight.

    That was when I knew we better head out. Perhaps SLPD needs to do some patrolling to keep bad elements out.

    This is not a park I would feel safe in walking alone. Regardless of the time of day.

    I do want to go back another day and check out the cemetery. It has been a while and I have not taken a look since they moved the controversial Jaybird Woodpecker monument there from Richmond.

    Despite the park being a little shady (pun intended) it is pretty cool to be able to escape into nature so close to home.
    Written 22 September 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • SnowyShasta
    Portland, OR1,730 contributions
    We stayed in the Marriott Hotel just off of the town square and enjoyed the walkable area. There were many restaurants nearby, and in the evenings the main square had music and other entertainment, including a kids' movie. There is a parking garage nearby, which was free and always had space. Overall this was a nice place to hang out and enjoy an evening.
    Written 26 October 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Faye S
    Seattle, WA26 contributions
    Very good walking trail and plenty of places to sit. The water fountain/pond in the center of the park is very nice. Plenty of close parking. Clean restroom.
    Written 1 April 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • mojomo
    Texas6,377 contributions
    We were just looking for a new place to go for a walk safely during Covid-times and my daughter chose this park.

    Crazy because I somewhat knew about it, but we’d never been. I knew the city had developed an area for festivals along the Brazos.

    We’ve been to Sugar Land Memorial Park, which is just up the road.

    That evening we had started to go for a walk in our usual neighborhood, but that can get boring after repeat visits. We went up 6 and approached Oyster Creek Park, but the parking lot was pretty full. This was a hot Saturday evening in August.

    We try to avoid crowds with Covid. Even with masks, it just makes me uncomfortable.

    So we headed to Brazos River Park. The biggest drawback are the idiotic drivers when you take the Crabb River Road exit heading toward Richmond. People drive too fast! You have to do a turnaround under the freeway and then briefly go up like you are getting on 59 over the River and a quick turn to the right. This was what we had to do, since we were on the Sugar Land City side. I am not sure if there is another internal approach.

    There is ample parking & we were relieved to see not many people and cars were sensibly spaced out.

    The park is so nice and wide open. There were restroom facilities, which we did not approach bc of the virus.

    We took a walk through open fields (with frisbee golf set ups) on nice wide sidewalks toward the Brazos River.

    Some gorgeous old trees and wildflowers along the way. We could see trails in heavily wooded area along the River that we want to check out at some point. The signage said from dawn till dusk and we decided to pass because it was almost dark.

    We were just so happy to get out and move around freely without the crowds we see at Memorial Park, Oyster Creek and Lost Creek Parks.

    There is more walking across the way facing UofH campus and Smart Financial Center off in the distance. Very wide open, with wide walkways and people seemed to really be respecting everyone’s space with Covid.

    I really wish the city would create more park space around and beyond the old Sugar Factory. We desperately need it.
    Written 16 August 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Try_travel001
    1,360 contributions
    The trail is currently closed for renovation.
    But you can walk in the open area out side.
    There's a war memorial to the right with restrooms and picnic tables.
    Written 21 November 2018
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • SLTerry
    Sugar Land, TX7 contributions
    Visited the market to find locally made items to take to family overseas. I wasn't disappointed. Found some great local jewelry artisans, pecan snacks, and herbal moisturizers/soaps. Everyone was friendly and helpful. If you're into Kombucha, the Kombucha Company from Richmond, Texas is there regularly.
    Written 3 September 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • 546lovetotravel
    Shreveport, LA75 contributions
    Lots of parking in lovely quaint neighborhood. Beautiful interior and very clean and well kept grounds. Large parish hall with convenient and clean bathrooms. Attended funeral mass with a reception afterwards. Store bought finger sandwiches, chips, dip, cookies, and cake.
    Written 17 June 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Try_travel001
    1,360 contributions
    Just for taking photos.

    Now in the holiday season there's a beautiful Christmas tree and a Santa.
    A water fountain and some Christmas decorations.
    Check the website for various activities.
    Written 14 December 2018
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • OpinonatedTasteBud
    Sugar Land, TX52 contributions
    Runners, walkers, cyclist and many enjoy the park. Families bring their elders and children to play in the park while teams practice on the soccer fields.
    Written 28 September 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Vincent M
    New Orleans, LA2,213 contributions
    The Vietnamese Buddhist Center (VNBC) is a smashing Buddhist complex in Sugar Land, TX. As a TA attraction, the #1 reason to go is their statue of the Goddess of Mercy. I’ll discuss the statue first, then the Goddess herself, a few other sights in the complex, and finish the review with an amazing occurrence at the VNBC five years ago, which is still casting a long shadow over the place.

    On arrival: the first thing to strike your eye will be a grey tripod backed by a row of ornamental pillars (see Tripod and Pillars photo). Beyond the pillars, a walkway leads towards the Main Temple, with a slightly arched red bridge taking you over a pond. (see Bridge Over Untroubled Waters photo). On the north side of the pond is a “white marble” barge with an avian bow and a haloed deity aboard. No oars, sails or outboard motors will ever move that boat an inch, which is just as well: if it ever did get out into open waters, it would sink like a slab of concrete (which is what I suspect it is; see Celestial Barge photo). But dominating both bridge and barge is the statue of a beautiful and serene Goddess of Mercy: Quan Am (see Quan Am 1 photo).

    Statues Standing Tall: The Goddess is the tallest free-standing statue in the entire the state of Texas, being a good five feet taller than the statue of Sam Houston over in Huntsville: no brag, just fact. She’s 22 meters tall—about 72 feet. She is the 5th, 6th or 7th tallest statue in the United States, depending on how you count. Not every upright artistic creation is a statue; I don’t consider totem poles, Egyptian obelisks or the Seattle Space Needle to be statues. Based on that, the “Tree of Utah” (a single metallic column with giant pawn shop balls on top) isn’t really a statue at all, making our Quan Am the 6th tallest. The five taller ones include four with human figures and one of mythical beasts, but the tallest of all in Puerto Rico: which means that our Sugar Land Goddess is the 5th tallest statue in any of the 50 states in the USA.

    Local Buddhists are proud that this is the tallest Goddess of Mercy in the Western Hemisphere. By that, they may mean “the Americas.” But the Western Hemisphere is everything west of the prime meridian and east of the international dateline. Unless there’s a taller Quan Am in the UK between Greenwich and Cornwall, this Goddess of Mercy is literally the tallest in our entire half of the planet, from pole to pole. I also believe that she is the largest Buddhist statue of any sort in the western hemisphere; the tallest Buddha in North America, in British Columbia, is less than half her height; and the USA and Canada are the only two countries in the Americas with substantial Buddhist populations.

    In Asian culture, having the tallest Goddess of Mercy in your hemisphere is a tremendous coup. Though you may never have heard of her, 9 of the 20 tallest statues on Earth are of this Goddess of Mercy! The other 11 are six Buddhas, a Buddhist “Bodhisattva”, one Vishnu, one Confucius, one Mother Russia, and the Indian statesman Sardar Patel (the only secular figure in the lot, if we consider Confucianism a religion, and Mother Russia to be as close to a goddess as the CP-USSR could get in the immediate post-Stalin era). Mother Russia’s statue is well east of the Don River (since antiquity the dividing line between Europe and Asia), so arguably all 20 of the 20 tallest statues are in Asia. Asia dominates the giant statue market: in Rangoon you can go see three giant Buddhas in a single morning. Even four of the world’s tallest statues of Jesus are in Asia (Vietnam and East Timor each have one, and Indonesia has two). Asians have been making monumental religious statues for a long, long time: a 5.3 meter (17.4 ft) preserved wooden idol from Shigir, Siberia was carved by hunter-gatherers 11,600 years ago: before the last Ice Age was over, and 8,000 years before the Bronze Age!

    The VNBC Statue: The VNBC Quan Am is standing on a lotus flower (the sacred flower of Buddhism as well as the national flower of Vietnam), with a vase of pure water in her left hand, and a small willow twig or leaf in her right hand: these are used to sprinkle the Dew of Compassion upon all beings. She is veiled and wears a flowing robe, with a curious crown underneath her veil: a visual connection to the crown worn by the celestial Buddha Amitabha, a central figure in Pure Land Buddhism, the branch of Mahayana (Great Raft) Buddhism which Vietnamese follow. The 19th tallest statue on Earth is a Quan Am in Da Nang, Vietnam. I’ve seen her, and the two statues are quite similar. Da Nang’s wears a more ornamental gown, is three times taller, and stands on a towering bluff overlooking the South China Sea, so she’s much more spectacular. On the other hand, the Sugar Land statue is a bit slimmer than Da Nang’s, and hence more beautiful, at least in the eyes of this beholder. I do wonder whether our statue’s artist, Mai Chi Kim, used Da Nang’s Goddess as her model, but it is a classic pose, one that you can find all over the Far East: I saw one Quan Am as far afield as northern Sumatra (and a northern Sumatran could say “Heck, I saw one as far afield as south Texas.”) You’ll note that offerings of food and flowers are always abundant at the statue. Unfortunately, you’ll also see that the base of the statue has been vandalized by hooligans, an outrage that Houstonians of any faith must deplore. Hopefully the damage will be repaired before you go there (see Quan Am 2, 3, 4 and 5 photos.)

    Who Quan Am Is: The Buddhist Goddess of Mercy is worshipped in many countries and hence has many names. The Chinese call her Guanyin or Kwan Yin; the Japanese, Kannon. One out of every five people on Earth worships Quan Am. Mahayana and Theravada Buddhists disagree fundamentally about many things, but they all worship Quan Am. Technically, she is a Bodhisattva, not a goddess. A Bodhisattva is someone who after mastering the dharmic arts and being on the cusp of attaining Nirvana, refrains from taking that last step, and remains within our world out of a desire to assist other humans. “Bodhisattva of Compassion” would be a more accurate title for her. Buddhists will tell you that Quan Am took vows to listen to the cries of the world; to deliver all beings from affliction, bondage and suffering; and to save them. Bottom line: if danger threatens you or your family, she comes to your aid. Quan Am is also strongly associated with the sea: she dwells eternally in the Southern Sea, and she steers the Ship of Salvation through the sea of sorrows in order to convey all beings to deliverance. If you’re offshore and a full gale is brewing, or inshore being driven relentlessly toward a deadly reef by a powerful current, she’s the one you’ll be praying to for deliverance. Just as children, when injured or terrified, instinctively call for their mothers, terrified seamen in Asian waters and their worried families ashore, will pray to Quan Am for their safe return.

    To put that in perspective, here’s a curious twist: during the Age of Discovery, when the Portuguese reached East Asia, both Christians and Buddhists experienced a shock of recognition is each others’ “goddesses of Mercy” (neither is a goddess per se). The Catholics’ Madonna, like Quan Am, is particularly associated with the sea. Our Lady, Star of the Sea (Stella Maris”) is an ancient Christian title for her; under that name, the Virgin Mary is believed to protect and guide seafarers in peril. Churches dedicated to her can be found along the coasts of southern Europe and beyond. For example, in the former capital of the Portuguese Indies, Goa, there’s a Chapel of Stella Maris overlooking the Arabian Sea (although a new Marriott beach resort is now smack-dab in-between the chapel and the sea). Once the Portuguese got to Macau and the Pearl River, the Chinese were particularly delighted with the Christian concept of the Madonna and Child, and began copying it but substituting Kwan Yin (aka Quan Am). That the Madonna always held an infant boy was particularly noted, and such statues were venerated both by childless wives, and those who had only borne girls and desperately wanted to deliver a “number one son.” You can find small statues of both the “Madonna and Child” and “Kwan Yin holding Infant”, for sale on Western and Asian websites, each quoting a price that is also virtually identical: $16 and change!

    Other Notable Features: Elsewhere at the VNBC, I rather like the temple bell. and the three-story pagoda that towers above it. The pagoda walls are made of bricks; its architectural style is—err, ah---Vietnamese-American. The huge bell itself is strictly Asian—ornate from yoke to lip—and the external clapper is a beauty! (See Pagoda 1, Pagoda 2, Bell, and Bell Clapper photos.) Nearby you’ll see a life-sized reclining Buddha, about to end his life here and attain Nirvana, and a plaque relates his last words (see The Buddha photo). The garden between the main temple and the Dharma Hall is small but aesthetically pleasing, with some Buddhas and nice bonsai. (see Garden 1, Garden 2. and Bonsai photos.) The Dharma Hall’s exterior is pleasant and balanced (see Dharma 1 and Dharma 2 photos) but the interior is functional rather than aesthetic. If you care to meditate, you can go inside and do so (see Dharma Interior photos.) It’s nothing to write home about, but it will have to do until the new Main Temple work is completed. And that brings us to a remarkable tale.

    Bringing Down the House: I started the review by stating that the Vietnamese Buddhist Center is a “smashing” Buddhist complex. Unfortunately, that was literally true. Here was the daily temple drill: the resident monks would get up at 5am and promptly head over to the temple to meditate. The general public would go into the temple to pray and meditate from early morning until quite late at night, when the temple would be closed again until dawn. The Temple was often packed, particularly on Buddhist holidays, and above all during the annual Quan Am Festival. (That festival, by the way, might be an excellent time to be here.) In 2014, the day before Halloween (when witches and demons are said to particularly dangerous), the entire roof of the main temple collapsed. I don’t know why or how: it had been there for twenty years, and had given no warning signs of a structural flaw. It goes without saying that in such a catastrophe, most of the folks below would be killed, and anyone who survived under the debris would be terribly injured. But not a soul was even scratched. The collapse occurred at 0145, one of the very rare times where no one—absolutely no one—would be inside. That timing saved dozens, and perhaps hundreds, of lives. A grand new temple is rising from the ashes; the roof is up, but work is still being done on the interior (see Work in Progress 1 and 2 photos.) It’s taken a long time just to complete the exterior; understandably the architects, engineers, contractors, and Vietnamese Buddhist community want the new temple to be as solid as the Rock of Gibraltar, while also being a thing of inspirational beauty. They’re eagerly looking forward to the new, improved, temple. I do recommend visiting the Vietnamese Buddhist Center now—I went three times in the same week—but there’s still construction going on, and you won’t be permitted inside the main temple. You could wait until the job is finished, but when will that be? I asked the abbot, and he said: “Six months … perhaps nine months … we hope.”

    I highly recommend the VNBC now, and am confident it will be even better a year from now, when the new temple opens. At the end of my final visit, I sat in the garden in front of the Dharma Hall for a bit, trying to absorb it all, and then I slowly drove back toward the entrance, thinking about some of the last words of the Buddha: “All phenomena are imperfect and subject to decay and death.” When I got to the pond, I stopped my care], took one last look at the Goddess of Mercy, and thought about the dire threat that had would up not injured not a single soul. I gave her a thumbs-up and said “Good job!”
    Written 13 March 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
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