Luxor Ancient Ruins

Ancient Ruins in Luxor, Egypt

Luxor Ancient Ruins

Types of Attractions
Sights & Landmarks
Sights & Landmarks
Awards
Traveler rating
Good for
61 places sorted by traveler favorites
  • Things to do ranked using Tripadvisor data including reviews, ratings, number of page views, and user location.
Showing results 1-30 of 61

What travelers are saying

  • Omaima S
    Istanbul, Türkiye2 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    The temple had z beautiful views, the complex is absolutely wonderful and great, we been ti the temple in early morning before the crowd . Nice visit
    Written July 8, 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • eddie Connor
    London, UK21 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Awesome how some of these burial chambers look like they were painted last week. Stepping back into history was a privilege, but those deep tombs are really hot,person at entrance who stamps your ticket provides you with a cardboard fan but expects a tip. An honour to visit the tomb of Tutankhamen at an extra cost of £10. His body is still in the tomb along with one of the outer caskets. You are now allowed to take pictures without a flash thank goodness. An absolute MUST
    Written July 12, 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Randburg
    Randburg, South Africa364 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Magnificent site that spans the history of so many eras in Egypt’s history.

    There was also a rare statue of King Tut and his wife, some Roman fresco, obelisks and the great avenue of Sphinxes.
    Written June 30, 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Randburg
    Randburg, South Africa364 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Unfortunately much of this temple was destroyed on the inside by rivals of the queen so not much left to see inside, but the setting of the temple amongst the desert mountain scape is fantastic. Worth an hour or so to visit.
    Written June 30, 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Robert D
    Brooklyn, New York4,185 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    When you visit the Valley of the Kings, you will be impressed by the many tombs here. Your regular admission ticket allows you to visit three tombs, but there a few that require an extra ticket. The most famous of these is of course King Tut. Howard Carter discovered his tomb here in 1922. Although the treasures from the tomb have been removed, you can go inside and see King Tutankhamun's stone sarcophagus and his mummy. Since the tomb itself is small and many people want to see it, you will have to wait a while to get in. They only let a limited number inside at any one time. It is definitely worth the wait and the cost of the extra ticket.
    Written May 1, 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Kendall B
    13 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    This was well worth the additional cost to see in the valley of the Kings. It is the least expensive but one of the largest as it also includes Ramses V tomb.
    Written June 25, 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Tiago Barroso
    Alhandra, Portugal893 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Every year i visit Egypt, and always give a stop at Karnak Temple and Luxor Temple, the avenue of Sphinxes are huge with very beautiful sphinx of deity Amun-Rá protecting the faraó, is a avenue with many and beautiful sphinx, it is a place who worth to see, I truly recommend.
    Written March 7, 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Susan C
    Melbourne, Australia1,489 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Renowned in poetry and truly large these ruined statues are looking very much the worse for wear. They are roped off and the area behind them is off-limits as the temple complex behind them is being excavated. However, it only takes a moment to visit them and there is no cost so nothing is wasted by looking at them.
    Written April 6, 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Robert D
    Brooklyn, New York4,185 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    This magnificent tomb is worth the extra ticket you need to purchase to enter. Nefertari was the principal wife of Ramesses II. Notice Nefertari's dark skin. She was a Nubian. The tomb is richly decorated and quite impressive.

    I later found out from my tour guide that Nefertari's tomb closed for renovations the day after we visited. We were among the last tourists to be able to visit it.
    Written May 1, 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Susan C
    Melbourne, Australia1,489 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    KV 11 Rameses III is a long descending corridor tomb punctuated with multiple chambers, two of them, including the burial chamber, with pillars. There are multiple small decorated chambers and niches off the first two corridors. It is another tomb with well preserved paintings and sunken reliefs on the walls, pillars and some ceilings. Glass panels protect the paintings. This was one of our guide's top 3 recommendations of the three tombs included in the Valley of the Kings entry fee.
    Written April 8, 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Co L
    North Willoughby, Australia13 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    The village of Deir el Medina, home of the workers who built the royal tombs KV, and their tombs are well worth the visit. Being return visitors with reasonable knowledge we simply found a taxi driver, Asem, with good English who knew exactly where we wanted to go from the corniche in Luxor across to the West Bank. Negotiated a price that included waiting and then taking us on to some specific nobles tombs before returning us to our hotel. Much cheaper than a guide and private tour.
    Written October 9, 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Silviya D
    London, UK9 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    I visited it in February and it was not crowded at all. Had a great time and it’s definitely a must see when you visit Luxor.
    Written May 13, 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Susan C
    Melbourne, Australia1,489 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    There are only four tombs open in the Valley of the Queens (which should be called the Valley of the Queens and Princes). The most vibrant and beautiful of them, not only in the Valley of the Queens but also in the Valley of the Kings, is the Tomb of Nefertari which requires a significant extra payment to view and you are only allowed 10 minutes to do so though there is some lee-way on the timing. If you can afford it and can move fast then it is worth it. The other three tombs appear to date from the time of Ramses III and are smaller and less spectacular but still worth-while viewing, particularly as they are included in the entry price. The Valley of the Queens is less visited than the Valley of the Kings so you never feel crowded and it will only take an hour or so to visit.

    QV 66 Nefertari. When we arrived the Tomb of Nefertari was currently uncrowded so we saw it first and, to some degree, it spoiled us for the other tombs in the Valley of the Queens (though we got over it). It is a large tomb. You descend stairs into a chamber with one side room then descend more stairs to the 8 x 10 meter burial chamber with four pillars and three symmetrical side rooms. The pictures of Nefertari and the various gods on the painted plaster are colourful, vibrant and wonderfully preserved. Ceilings have the stars on black pattern. Wooden stairs and floors have been laid but there is no glass between you and the paintings. However, there is a 10 minute time limit in viewing this temple so you have to move fast! Photography is now permitted so I snapped away as fast as I could just so I would have time to savour it later.

    QV 52 Titi. After seeing Nefertari's tomb the colours of the sunken plaster reliefs in Titi's tomb seemed washed out but we came to appreciate the difference and admire it for itself. Most walls are protected by glass panels and there are places where the plaster has been damaged. The ceilings have a faded but well-preserved star night pattern. There is a corridor with side chambers, a hall and burial chamber.

    QV 55 Amen Khopshef / Amunherkhepshef. This tomb consists of an inclined entrance way, two chambers with side rooms (these are currently closed to visitors) and a burial chamber with a sarcophagus. The son of King Ramses III died in his teens and he is shown with his father in some of the paintings. The extensive sunken relief painted plaster has some bright colours. Much of the walls are protected by glass barriers.

    QV 44 Kha M Waset or Khaemwaset. Another one of King Ramses III's sons is buried here in this corridor-type tomb consisting of an entrance way, a room with two side rooms then the burial room with two doorways that lead nowhere and a final square chamber. Khaemwaset is pictured with his father and the gods on the walls again in sunken relief painted plaster. These colourful paintings are protected by glass barriers.
    Written April 6, 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Susan C
    Melbourne, Australia1,489 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    I visited the Valley of the Nobles on the same day as my second visit to the Valley of the Kings though it could also be combined with other sites even closer by. If you are short of time this isn't a "must see" but it only added an extra hour to the day as there were only two groups of temples open and the nobles' tombs are a lot smaller than those of the kings. We bought tickets for both of the groups that were open. We walked to the top of the hill from the entry point and started with Senofer's tomb then the nearby Rakhmire's then went to the next group which were all close together.

    Since the tombs and temples of the royalty primarily depict religious themes, I was interested in seeing how the Tombs of the Nobles depicted everyday ancient Egyptian life. In the easy-to-enter tombs the tomb guards will arrange mirrors to provide more light inside and will expect a tip. Considering that the Valley of the Nobles is only lightly trafficked we considered a small tip wasn't inappropriate to the guards stuck out here all day.

    Group I was Rakhmire and Senofer

    TT96 Senofer. You descend some short steep stairs to an antechamber that leads to the burial chamber with four pillars. The undulating ceiling is covered with paintings of grape vines which give way to geometric patterns and all the walls are decorated with pictures of Sennofer and his family. These colourful paintings are behind glass protective glass and there are some places where the wall plaster is missing.

    TT100 Rakhmire. This tall and narrow T-shaped tomb is easily entered by a door at the top of the T intersection. There is a long chamber immediately ahead sloping upwards eight meters to a false door and the two cross sections of the T heading left and right. All walls are decorated with small detailed pictures of Egyptians at work with only a few larger paintings. In some places the plaster has come off but everything has a lot of colour.

    Group II's ticket lists just Ramose on it but it also includes Userhat and Kaemhat.

    TT55 Ramose. Ramose's tomb consists of a corridor heading towards an Hypostyle Hall then a smaller pillared hall finishing at a shrine. It has some beautifully coloured reliefs in the Hypostyle Hall but much is unfinished with sections of uncoloured very delicate reliefs. In other sections you just have the outlines on the wall showing the process of decorating the tombs which is actually very interesting as it shows a production line approach of penciller, inker, carver and colourer (much like comics do).

    TT56 Userhat. There is easy-to-enter gate leading directly to a traverse hall then an inner chamber with a niche. The walls are decorated with subdued but colourful army scenes, hunting and daily life scenes. The ceiling is decorated in a geometric pattern.

    TT57 Khaemhat. Another easy-to-enter tomb with a traverse hall then a widening central passage leading to an inner room. This tomb had pairs of statues in the traverse hall and the inner room. The walls have both raised and sunken reliefs and subdued colouring.
    Written April 6, 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Susan C
    Melbourne, Australia1,489 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    KV 8 (Merenptah) is the second largest tomb at about 165 meters in length. The long descent is punctuated first with a pillared chamber with side chambers and both stairways and chambers have many colourful raised and sunken reliefs and paintings. After this chamber many of the paintings have been damaged by flooding so in the next small chamber and the the pillared burial chamber, again with side chambers, paintings can only be seen high on the walls. There are some ceilings with blue sky and stars. The burial chamber has a sarcophagus and a decorated granite block but the side chambers appear empty. This was one of our guide's top 3 recommendations of the three tombs included in the Valley of the Kings entry fee.
    Written April 8, 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
All Luxor HotelsLuxor Hotel DealsLast Minute Hotels in Luxor
All things to do in Luxor
Day Trips in Luxor
RestaurantsFlightsTravel StoriesCruisesRental Cars