Unhyeongung
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Home of the murdered Matriarch
4.0 of 5 bubblesSep 2022
This Women’s palace is close to Changdeokgung palace, because sometimes the Queen and her attendants had to walk to ceremonial gatherings within the men’s domain. After Chungbeok palace denies entry, free of charge, you can still enter the sparsely decorated Unhyeongung palace (1864-1898). Korea’s last Queen was murdered by Japan’s imperial leaders, which precipitated the execution and national Korean resistance movement, sparked by An Jung-geun in the Goguryeo traditional Korean stronghold of Manchuria (Harbin). Quiet though it may be, history centres on this small relic or plot of once-royal land, never recovered with the death of Korea’s monarchy. If you don’t have time to visit Seoul Museum of History, a small exhibit hall is free here at the Royal Residence of the royal partner and prince regent, anti-western Heungseon Daewongun (b. 1820). Queen Min or Myeongseong was likely murdered here by Japanese agents, infiltrating Unhyeongung, as French newspapers reported that year. Korean empress Queen “Min” was assassinated in the early hours of October 8, 1895, at Okho-ru (옥호루, 玉壺樓) Pavilion in the Geoncheonggung (건청궁, 乾淸宮), which was considered the rear private royal residence inside Gyeongbokgung Palace at the time. After verifying that they had indeed killed the Korean Queen, the assassins burned her body. This enraged Koreans subjugated from the 1870s by Japan and western colonial powers, and justice or revenge was proclaimed widely for the murder of Koreans’ matriarch at this palace. It also preserves the memory of the 1876 decline of the dynasty (Feb. 11-26) after the USS Monocacy, 1871 American military act of aggression in Korea’s Gamgwhado (Sinmiyangyo) or General Sherman Incident of Oct. 1866: the year France invaded after Daewongun’s anti-Catholic suppression (anticolonial Byeonginyangyo). Resistance toward the West is symbolized at the palace by Chukhwabi (1871 Daewongun monument) at the palace. Here was the centre of intrigue at the royal bodyguard living quarters (male Noandong), built during Emperor Gojong’s reign, across the major street in the direction of Insadong traditional shopping district. Surrounded by bamboos, Unhyeongung offers breezy respite. Central Norakdang functioned as a meeting hall, where you can sit outside and eat a picnic lunch. Near the rear well “Irodong” is a hidden courtyard designated for the Regent’s wife. The pine tree Daebusong was appointed Jeongeepum (minister) under Emperor Kojong, and on the other side of the wall, the royal gardens continue, as absorbed by the Women’s University in the royal capital of Seoul…not to be missed!

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Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

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4.0
4.0 of 5 bubbles150 reviews
Excellent
46
Very good
68
Average
32
Poor
2
Terrible
2

Norm the Nomad
Australia1,225 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2023 • Couples
This is one of 5 main places in Seoul. Whilst it is one of the smaller palaces it is certainly worth a visit as it does provide some good insight into what life was like fro past Korean royalty.
Written October 19, 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

AnLil
913 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2022 • Family
This Women’s palace is close to Changdeokgung palace, because sometimes the Queen and her attendants had to walk to ceremonial gatherings within the men’s domain. After Chungbeok palace denies entry, free of charge, you can still enter the sparsely decorated Unhyeongung palace (1864-1898). Korea’s last Queen was murdered by Japan’s imperial leaders, which precipitated the execution and national Korean resistance movement, sparked by An Jung-geun in the Goguryeo traditional Korean stronghold of Manchuria (Harbin). Quiet though it may be, history centres on this small relic or plot of once-royal land, never recovered with the death of Korea’s monarchy. If you don’t have time to visit Seoul Museum of History, a small exhibit hall is free here at the Royal Residence of the royal partner and prince regent, anti-western Heungseon Daewongun (b. 1820). Queen Min or Myeongseong was likely murdered here by Japanese agents, infiltrating Unhyeongung, as French newspapers reported that year. Korean empress Queen “Min” was assassinated in the early hours of October 8, 1895, at Okho-ru (옥호루, 玉壺樓) Pavilion in the Geoncheonggung (건청궁, 乾淸宮), which was considered the rear private royal residence inside Gyeongbokgung Palace at the time. After verifying that they had indeed killed the Korean Queen, the assassins burned her body. This enraged Koreans subjugated from the 1870s by Japan and western colonial powers, and justice or revenge was proclaimed widely for the murder of Koreans’ matriarch at this palace. It also preserves the memory of the 1876 decline of the dynasty (Feb. 11-26) after the USS Monocacy, 1871 American military act of aggression in Korea’s Gamgwhado (Sinmiyangyo) or General Sherman Incident of Oct. 1866: the year France invaded after Daewongun’s anti-Catholic suppression (anticolonial Byeonginyangyo). Resistance toward the West is symbolized at the palace by Chukhwabi (1871 Daewongun monument) at the palace. Here was the centre of intrigue at the royal bodyguard living quarters (male Noandong), built during Emperor Gojong’s reign, across the major street in the direction of Insadong traditional shopping district. Surrounded by bamboos, Unhyeongung offers breezy respite. Central Norakdang functioned as a meeting hall, where you can sit outside and eat a picnic lunch. Near the rear well “Irodong” is a hidden courtyard designated for the Regent’s wife. The pine tree Daebusong was appointed Jeongeepum (minister) under Emperor Kojong, and on the other side of the wall, the royal gardens continue, as absorbed by the Women’s University in the royal capital of Seoul…not to be missed!
Written September 11, 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Culinary-Consultants
Ferrara, Italy3,745 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jan 2020
This place is seemingly like most palaces we have seen in Seoul. Speaking fro a design, layout and architectural pint of view. But historically speaking the Unhyeongung Palace has a rich history on its own.

The Unhyeongung Palace, also known as Unhyeongung Royal Residence, is a former Korean royal residence here in, Seoul, Korea. It was formerly the residence of the Heungseon Daewongun; a prince regent of Korea during the Joseon Dynasty in the 19th century, and father of Emperor Gojong.

We had the luck to go during a sunny day regardless of the bitter winter this January 2020. The thing that stroke us the most is its seemingly resemblance to Japanese style homes and the materials used in it; which are also in line with the Japanese style.

The gardens are filled with large, medium and nano Bonsai trees. The total atmosphere is one of relaxing and one of meditation. A real treat today for us.

This palace is quaint and not nearly as colorful as the others. The wood has not been painted the colorful hues of green, red and yellows like the grander palaces, Changdeokgung for example, but that means this one is just a little different and just a little special that way.

We highly recommend this beautiful palace as one of the least good looking ones, but the one with most charm of all the 5 palaces to be visited in Seoul.
Written February 2, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

doctorfoxtrot
Taguig City, Philippines12,820 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2019 • Family
It is right in the middle of the city. Near a station . Tour guide recommended this place to accommodate my mother in law who is wheel chair borne. Compared to the main palaces in Seoul , this place is actually not bad. 30 minutes visit duration would be enough . Besides it is free to enter this complex .
Written January 3, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Itravel0ne
Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia2,397 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2019 • Family
Right in the middle of the city near the Anguk station. We were staying nearby and stop by to visit this quiet place before check in.
Written September 3, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

ellycmc7
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia262 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2019
This was our first palace in Seoul. It is situated just steps away from Anguk station via exit 4. We dropped by as we were too early for the tour in Changdeokgung and were surprised to find this hidden gem. It is not one of the main palaces but worth going since it is free and if you have time. There is a small exhibit within the palace about the clothings worn by the residents of the palace in the past. Interesting.
Written August 12, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

LG_Kay
Singapore, Singapore7,519 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2019 • Solo
I visited this place as my hotel is nearby. Else I will not make it in my itinerary. It was once the house of Heungseon Daewongun, the father of King Gojong. Despite its location in the middle of the city, this compound remains peaceful and quiet. It is a small complex, with a few traditional buildings. 20 mins is sufficient to briefly explore this place. Free admission, closed on Monday.
Written July 2, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

247Carpe_Diem
Seoul, South Korea642 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2019 • Solo
Go to Anguk station, it just 3 minutes walking distance from the station. The entrance is free. Please see pictures below for their opening time. It's a small and cozy palace.
Written July 1, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Linda K
Port Saint Lucie, FL2,276 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2019 • Couples
This would not be a "destination" palace, but if you are in the area it is worth stopping by for a quick stroll. Admission is free of charge and an English brochure is available at the entrance to provide orientation and historical perspective.
Written June 21, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

RuthNina
Jakarta, Indonesia105 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jan 2019
It doesn't have the grand of Gyeongbokgung Palace but if you're looking for a grand palace without the swarming tourist, here's the place. It's really quiet, with only few people around. You'll see family taking professional photos in traditional clothes, school students going on a field trip and a handful number of tourist. Located near Anguk station, it's quite easy to find when you came straight from the station. I walked from the other side of Insa-dong and got lost before finally reached the palace. Expect to spend 1-2 hours going around the palace. There's a nice indoor museum too, which you shouldn't miss.
Written June 16, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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UNHYEONGUNG: All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go (with Photos)

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